Tuesday, December 27, 2011

KWAW ANSAH MOVIE "SUFFERING TO LOSE"

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Thank you Jesus. Finally ghana's finest and veteran movie makers are slowly coming back. I hoped for this and my dream are coming true. Hopefully our great actors like Majid, Martha, Adjettey, Nana Kwame etc - will finally have choices besides the likes of Venus and all the other hooplas. So finally Kwaw is back, plus we have Shirley and Leila. Finally ghana movie industry (GMI) will take a better turn.
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Renowned Ghanaian film maker, Kwaw Ansah (producer of renowned movie "Love Brewed in African Pot" will premiere the third installment of ‘The Good Old Days’ movies, titled ‘Suffering to Lose’ at the National Theatre on the January 7 with a repeat on January 8, 5:00pm and 8:30pm each night.
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‘Suffering to Lose’ is an intriguing and compelling story of love, family and relationship which portrays the hallmark of a good African woman who suffers through thick and thin for her family’s financial success. From the dawn of time, life has been sustained by the marriage of man and woman. And whether the marriage becomes a success or failure depends on the determination of the two to endure the challenges of life. But how do we often remember the woman in the success story? Or is the woman, indeed, her own enemy?
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‘Suffering to Lose’ which takes viewers through the journey of life, success and reward is set in the 1950s and 1960s. It ends with a mixture of love and tragic events that are sure to capture the imagination of the viewing public and cause people to re-examine their interpersonal relations, which tend to pose a great challenge to society.
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‘Suffering to Lose’ features pioneers of the Ghana film industry such as Akofa Ajeani Asiedu, Ekow Bingo Baiden, Albert Jackson Davis, Ekow Smith Asante, Akosua Agyapong, Portia Asare Boateng, Agnes Dapaah and Emmary Brown
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Tickets are available at TV Africa, Koala, Max-mart and Batsonaa Total Filling Station. Rate – Ghc20.00 Regular, and GHc35.00 Special tickets which give two VCD’s on entry. This event is sponsored by, MTN, Obaapapa, Kasapreko Alomo Bitters and supported by Indomie, Special Ice Mineral Water, DDP, Ultra Films and Ink it.
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I cant wait to see this movie - the "hair aboy" alone kills me (aboy is ghana's slang for the hair partition LOL) - you only have to be old school to know wuzzup. I can imagine the Tunabu's and your guarantee in tow (tunabu is the trousers with the big wide bottom, and guarantee is the shoes with the big platform bottoms). You were the flyest if you had your aboy hair style ,your tunabu trousers and guarantee shoe platforms back in the day.
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I am so excited for 2012 - first i hear the good news of Nigeria New Cinema - which is a joint effort of all the best movie makers like Kunle, Lancelot, Teco, Emem I, Vivian E etc - belonging to an association whose ultimate goal is to produce and give the audience quality international level movies - which movies - better equipments - better scripts etc etc. My ultimate wish is that the mediocre illiterates who have saturated the market producing one nonsense after the next be weeded out finally, so its exciting news to me when i hear such.

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3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Actually, you are wrong. "Tunabu" was the name for drainpipe trousers as the name "Tu" -- shotgun, and "nabu" -- opening/mouth in Ga language suggest. The name for wide-leg trousers was "bell-bottoms" or "abee - shikpon" -- in Ga meaning sweeping the floor

Personally, I think Kwaw Ansah's initial repudiation of video-filmmaking in favor of only celluloid cost him a great deal in the long run. Why? The new video & digital film industry passed him by and now he's trying to catch up. Secondly, his inability to set his stories in anything but the elite strata of colonial Ghana seems too nostalgic and dismissive of contemporary Ghana. A true filmmaker ought to be able to tell stories both old and new. Love Brewed was overly simplistic. I re-watched it recently and wondered why there was so much gaga when it first came out during my early college days.

He was lauded by default because there was no competition at the time, plus the cost of celluloid filmmaking meant that very few people could afford or attract financial investment to make films. Just like the advantage of the francophone filmmakers who would be non-existent if not for the sponsorship from the french Cultural Ministry.

- Zizi

Miss T-i-l-i-i (African Movie Reviewer) said...

Zizi you are so right - you explained it way better than me.Thanks ooh my sister. Lol - Tunabu vs Bell Bottoms - two different things

I also agree with you on the Kwaw ansah thing. He is a great director i think he needs a new modern theme - than the 60s stuff.

Anonymous said...

I bet to differ on your veiw of Kwaw Ansah's inability to tell stories centered on modern Ghana. Though Ata Mensah of Showcase in Ga fame wrote the story, Kwaw Ansah cowrote the screeplay and directed Harvest at 17. A movie about teenagers and wrong parenting.This film was not set in the colonial nor early post independence era. Mr. Ansah is a traditionalist and this happens to take centre stage in his movies. Inflexibility in this direction is simply not a befitting tag.

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